Twin State Flyers
EAA Chapter 740
W. Lebanon NH 03784


Classified Ads

WANTED

WANTED: VSI, Altimeter, Vertical Compass, and Turn & Bank Indicator (electric), for RANS S-6S project. Call Frank Brunot @ 802-674-5698.

FOR SALE

FOR SALE: Christavia Mk 4 project. The following items go with the project:

Fuselage complete - except for the stringer standoff's on the belly which I was delaying until the engine had been final installed. The tubing has not been blasted and painted yet.

All flight surfaces completed - rudder, elevator, ailerons and flaps. The flaps have an adjustable up-stop so that they can be minutely adjusted on the ground for reflex or to correct rigging.

Cabin roof completed, all stringers (except for the belly stringers) completed.

Seats fabricated, both front seats covered with aluminum sheet.

Wings complete, two fuel tanks go with them. Wingtips completed and wings pre-wired for nav lights.

Wing struts completed, and fitted, not painted yet. The wings have been test fitted to the fuselage.

Piper Tripacer landing gear, including new tires.

Various pulleys and control cables.

THE ENGINE. The engine is a Ford 3.8L V6 originally engineered by David Blanton, although I don't claim the horsepower he insisted it could make. The engine is currently sitting in a test stand with casters so that it can be rolled around. The stand includes a fuel tank with a quick disconnect coupler, fuel pump, battery, cooling system and winch. The winch comes in very handy to move it around and drag it up into truck beds. The PSRU is by Northwest Aero with a 2-1 reduction ratio. The block was machined by WR machine shop. Wiseco 9-1 pistons were used and ARP studs for the cylinder heads and bearing blocks. New connecting rod bolts, modified intake manifold, Holley 350 CFM two-barrel carb with MacNeally leaning block. The leaning block works exactly like the mixture control on any aircraft engine and can shut down the engine at the idle/cutoff position. The prop is an IVO Magnum that is ground adjustable. The adjusting is accomplished by turning one threaded cylinder. All blades adjust at once. Roller rockers and many more extras.

The horsepower should be around 190 or so but it's hard to tell. Last night I had it up to 3,900 rpm, which is the most I've revved it to yet and at that point the prop pitch prevented any higher revving.

If anyone is interested in acquiring the project, please let me know.

Corky Scott. Email : Charles.K.Scott@dartmouth.edu